High Line Art Staff Picks

Gavin KenyonReliquary Void at MoMA PS 1

Trisha Brown, Embodied Practice and Site-Specificity at Governor’s Island

Mel Boucher, Strong Language at the Jewish Museum

James Lee Byars, ½ an Autobiography at MoMA PS1

The Longest Minute: “Time Line on the High Line”

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How long is a minute?

This was the question posed by artist David Lamelas during his performance “Time Line on the High Line.” The interactive piece took place in three different locations throughout the park on July 22, 23, and 24. Park visitors were invited to stand along a white strip of tape, in no particular order, and pass along the time. The performance began with an announcement of the time to the first participant in line. That person “holds” the time for an estimated one minute, at which point they then announce the time out loud and “pass” it to the next person. Visitors were encouraged to join the line at any point as well as use their native language to announce the time, adding their own subjective sense of time to the performance’s duration, both temporally and physically.

So, how long is a minute? Sixty seconds.

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A Thousand Words: Photos from Ryan McNamara’s “Misty Malarky Ying Yang”

imageOn July 16th and 17th, High Line Art presented Misty Malarky Ying Yang, a new performance by artist Ryan McNamara that celebrated the 35th anniversary of President Jimmy Carter’s famous 1979 “Malaise Speech.”

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High Line Art Staff Picks

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Nancy Rubins at Gagosian

Sarah Sze at the Bronx Museum

Here and Elsewhere at the New Museum

Triple Point (Planetarium), Sarah Sze. Photo by Jason Mandella

This September Louise Lawler will present “Triangle (adjusted to fit)” on #HighLineBillboard. Taken at Sotheby’s in #NYC, the image features works by Donald Judd, Frank Stella, and Sol LeWitt. 
Click here to learn more.

This September Louise Lawler will present “Triangle (adjusted to fit)” on #HighLineBillboard. Taken at Sotheby’s in #NYC, the image features works by Donald Judd, Frank Stella, and Sol LeWitt. 

Click here to learn more.

Remembering Johnny Linville

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“Sometimes you forget you’re 30 feet in the air. It’s kind of magical.” This is how Johnny Linville spoke of how he experienced the High Line when he began working here as a gardener in 2009. Five years later, Johnny’s sense of magic in the park was as strong as ever. It is with a heavy sense of loss that we announce his passing on August 1, 2014.

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blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC:  In this image, three visitors to the High Line park in New York take in one of the nightly screenings of the ever-popular video called “The Way Things Go”, recorded by the Swiss art duo Fischli and Weiss in 1987. The video works like the materialization of the imagined, chain-reaction scenario from a Rube Goldberg cartoon: A firecracker jolts a tire, that rolls into a ladder, that hits a toy car, that pushes a candle, that lights a fuse that shoots sparks into some gas, that catches fire … and on and on like that. (Click on my image to watch a clip.) It’s straightforward fun – that’s why it’s a surefire hit in museums – but it has a grimmer underside: It clearly also stands for the sense of hopelessness, and haplessness, that any artist has in the empty studio, and the sense that one artistic act follows another without any clear plan or reason, leaving more confusion than order behind. Rube Goldberg’s contraption always have a goal in mind; this one has none. (Photo by Timothy Schenck, courtesy Friends of the High Line)
For a full visual survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC:  In this image, three visitors to the High Line park in New York take in one of the nightly screenings of the ever-popular video called “The Way Things Go”, recorded by the Swiss art duo Fischli and Weiss in 1987. The video works like the materialization of the imagined, chain-reaction scenario from a Rube Goldberg cartoon: A firecracker jolts a tire, that rolls into a ladder, that hits a toy car, that pushes a candle, that lights a fuse that shoots sparks into some gas, that catches fire … and on and on like that. (Click on my image to watch a clip.) It’s straightforward fun – that’s why it’s a surefire hit in museums – but it has a grimmer underside: It clearly also stands for the sense of hopelessness, and haplessness, that any artist has in the empty studio, and the sense that one artistic act follows another without any clear plan or reason, leaving more confusion than order behind. Rube Goldberg’s contraption always have a goal in mind; this one has none. (Photo by Timothy Schenck, courtesy Friends of the High Line)

For a full visual survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive

A Closer Look at Archeo: Josh Kline’s “Skittles”

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Josh Kline’s “Skittles,” part of the group exhibition Archeo, is an industrial refrigerator containing smoothies produced by the artist using unconventional and poetic combinations of ingredients, including kale chips, squid ink, sneakers, phone bills, and pepper spray. Each smoothie stands as a portrait of a different contemporary lifestyle. When grouped together, they evoke a landscape of aspiration, taste, and – at times – deprivation in a metropolis like New York City.

 Learn more about the ingredients:

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#EmptyHighLine: Scenes from an Early Morning Stroll

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There are very few (good) reasons to awake at 5:30 AM, but the promise of a picturesque sunrise and room to roam brought out a snap-happy group of Instagrammers to the park on Wednesday, July 23. We joined with Instagram to welcome a small group to visit the park before it opened and document their adventures. The event, #emptyhighline, produced dozens of beautiful shots that captured the park in an early morning glow.  

Check out some of our favorites: 

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Getting ready for tonight’s #HighLinePerformance by David Lamelas. Join us for “Time Line on the High Line” at 6:30 PM on the High Line under The Standard Hotel.  (at High Line)

Getting ready for tonight’s #HighLinePerformance by David Lamelas. Join us for “Time Line on the High Line” at 6:30 PM on the High Line under The Standard Hotel. (at High Line)